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Sampling era, the norms in Hip Hop

From tape loops to vinyl recordings, sampling has been the evolution in hip hop, it changed the game allowing and giving every hip hop head a chance of creative indulgence of their own from anything and everything that came before them. However they were not sampling such records because they were too lazy to write or produce their own music but they sampled those records because they heard something on them that spoke to their creativity instantly, wanting to inject themselves in that music to be part of it. As time went on they found themselves inside a technology world to do so.

” In music we take something that we love and we build on it”

The whole idea of sampling started taking place in the early 70s even though in the late 60s the very first sampler which had been produced. Simply sampling is taking an element from a record and bringing something fresh and new to it, it does not necessarily mean using pre-existing recording as number of musicians have constructed pieces or songs by sampling certain fields in the recordings from other artists and different genre apart from what they will use it on and others have sampled their own original recordings. Hip hop grew and noticeable in the sampling scene as it gave way to the digital life we’re living in, digital samplers now evolving in the creation of hit tracks, truth be told we leaving in a post sampling era, add our original self gives way to be part of the evolution of music that we love to be linked with once it becomes something new again. For some, however, that has always been the award winning formula since the dawn of sampling era, there’s been endless of age.

Sampling example:

Original: Antena – Camino Del Sol (Joakim Remix)

Sample: Kwesta Feat Cassper Nyovest – Ngud’

The big Q: Is sampling legal?
Sampling an existing recording without permission is totally declared as copyright infringement of both the sound recording (usually owned by the record company) and the song itself (usually owned by the songwriter or the songwriter’s publishing company) occurs. For one to use a sample, permission is required from copyright owner of the recording. When an existing recording is sampled without permission, copyright infringement of both the sound recording (usually owned by the record company) and the song itself (usually owned by the songwriter or the songwriter’s publishing company) occurs as license fees for sampling vary greatly depending on: (1) how much of the music is sampled; (2) the popularity of the music you intend to sample; and (3) the intended use of the sample in your song (entirely using the whole song as a sample).  License fees for samples can be granted for free, for a percentage of royalties or for a flat fee. Because there are no statutory royalty rates for samples, the copyright owner can charge the artist whatever he wants for the use of the sample and can refuse to grant permission to other artists to sample his work.